The Skills

I’ve had a few interesting conversations in recent months about the different training agencies and the training components that make up the different courses. It’s been an opportunity to reflect on why we do different skills, and their importance in preparing for independent diving. Here’s a few on the PADI open water course to get started!

Assemble and dissemble equipment at least 5 times by end of confined water dive 5

This is a fairly straight forward skill and its importance should be clear. It’s important that the students are taking increasing responsibility for setting up their equipment and taking ownership of preparing for their dive. It takes time and when we’re up against the pool booking it can be something that causes a bit of frustration. There are lots of hoses and bits and pieces that take time for students to get sorted out but giving them a bit of time to get set up lets them build confidence.

Streamline Equipment

A recent blog on the worst habits of buddies led to a bit of discussion on this as it’s something that many people raised. Trailing SPGs or an octopus dragging through the silt is bad enough practice when it destroys visibility but there are more important concerns if you’re diving near coral and poorly organised kit can damage a century’s growth.

Demonstrate Scuba Equipment Care

Good habits instilled at the beginning will impact on the rest of your diving career. It’s easier to learn something well at the beginning than to have to unlearn bad habits. This is also part of the drive to be independent and develop positive skills for post certification.

Loose Cylinder Band

This is a skill that some may have used on a dive! A dry BCD on a cylinder is a possible slip risk and it’s happened to a diver when I’ve been guiding. I’ve also stepped in with a random diver underwater to hold her cylinder as she was transfixed by the fish!

www.oceandiver.co.uk

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